American Robin – Dampened Spirits in the Rain

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The Robins just returned to my part of the world on Monday. The day was sunny and warm. Tuesday was relatively nice too. It started to snow on Wednesday afternoon. This poor Robin was hunkered down on the patio, all puffed up with it’s wingtips lowered. I’ve read that this is a sign of aggression, but I think the robin was just trying to stay warm!

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The next morning it was a winter wonderland. I spent an hour or so taking pictures and following all the animal tracks that had been left over night.

I really wish I was out taking photos of spring flowers instead….

The Feather Files
Name: American Robin
Species: Turdus migratorius
Native to and Migration: The Robin breeds north to Alaska, across Canada, and southward to the coast of the Gulf of Mexico in the United States and into southern Mexico. Northern populations migrate.
Date Seen: June, 2016
Location: North of Calgary, Alberta, Canada

43 thoughts on “American Robin – Dampened Spirits in the Rain

  1. The snow is beautiful, but By the end of March , I think everyone one, including the robin, must be ready for spring. April is always a little confused, isn’t? Hopefully spring is headed your way, soon. Thankfully, the little robin brought along its own down coat. I hope today’s sunshine ushers in your spring. 🙂

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    1. Yes, April is confusing! We will likely have another heavy dump of snow after the tulips are up and the first leaves are on the trees.

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  2. I’ve seen a lot of robins for a few weeks. They all seem really plump (like your robin). It can’t all be fluffed up feathers, can it be? I wonder if the American Robin is experiencing the same increase in obesity rates as the American Citizen? 😉

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  3. I always thought puffing-up was a sign of aggression. Our native robins are so different from yours in colouring. Red on the breast, yes, but more a dull brown on the wings and back; they do look a lot smaller as well.

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  4. Hi,
    I agree it does look like the Robin is trying to stay warm. What a shame it turned cold again, I hope the weather improves for you soon.

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  5. Brrrrr! Your fluffed up robin and the wintry scene make me feel cold again. That’s how good you are with words and photos. We have a projected freeze here tonight. Wish I could fluff up like your robin. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Most blogs I follow are posting lovely spring and summer photos, while I’m still posting freezing photos. What a big, interesting world we live in.

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  6. Once again, beautiful pictures. Poor Robin!! They arrived in southern Maine about 2 weeks ago and while the weather has gotten cooler we have not been covered in the white fluffies again (although, winter was so mild I am predicting a nor’easter w/snow in April!!

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    1. Sounds like your weather is as unpredicatable as ours is! We had a mild winter too which was nice after the very severe one of the year before.

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  7. Hi Margie–my brother and sister-in-law in Alberta had quite a dumping of snow this week…and Faye took a picture of Les (my brother) snowblowing the yard wearing boots and SHORTS! That’s my brother–once April comes he refuses to wear jeans anymore…I’m that way with sandals…Faye says that Les and I are ‘two peas in a pod’! Hope spring arrives soon for us all.

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    1. Yes, much of the province got this snow, though it was much heavier in the north and west. In a month or so my husband will put shorts on too, and will refuse to wear jeans again until October, no matter what the temperature is!

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  8. You have funny weather over there ☃ ! Our Robins are happy in the garden.
    Although today the temperature is quite chilly and it is raining…

    Congrats Margie on your 40’000 views ☺☺☺

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    1. Yes, funny weather pretty much describes our spring… summer, fall and winter too! Thanks on the congrats.

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  9. I found a little yellow baby finch yesterday. He was just learning to fly. I hope the weather eases up so ll the fledglings can practice in good weather.

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  10. Oh, come visit me; I’ve got spring flowers to share 🙂 May spring grace you and your robins soon!

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    1. One of these days I’ll start posting all my spring flower pictures, and by that time you will all be posting summer flowers. By the time I post fall flowers – you’ll still be posting summer flowers!

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  11. ~faints dead away~ You got snow! Wowsers. I sure enough thought the days a cold and snowy were by now. When is your last predicted frost? Bundle up and keep warm. Your robin looks like it could use a cup of cocoa. I agree I think birds fluff out like that to keep warm too.
    Wishing you a lovely and warm Easter Sunday. 🙂

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    1. Thanks E.C. and Happy Easter to you too. Our last frost free day can be about May 23, and the first frost in the fall is about September 15. It is a fairly small growing season!

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  12. I hope the robin found a way to stay warm, and that spring shows up in your area soon. Our April often looks a lot like that, with snow and frost.

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    1. I agree! I certainly am not pleased with the weather man either, though I realize he is only the messenger.

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  13. Good to hear the snow started to melt the next day. That is the good thing about spring. The snow is short-lived. Beautiful picture of your robin.

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    1. You are certainly right – this time of year we can get huge dumps of snow, but they melt quickly.

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  14. Poor thing. It looks so cold. The scrub jays that visit us sit on our railing, puff out their feathers (when it’s cold) and look into our window waiting for handouts. We have decided it is one of their ways to get our attention and sympathy (haha).

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  15. Lovely photo … *smile – Still I think the Robin is too small for being the bird in the mist … and it has a little longer tail in my eyes.

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    1. I agree – normally robins do have longer looking tails. This poor cold robin had almost fluffed himself up into a ball!

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  16. Your robins look so much like our blackbirds, but with a red tummy (well they are cousins)! Our blackbirds (T. merula) are the best songsters in the UK imo (they are good mimics, too!). Now I have to look up your robins to see if they are just as talented! (Heard my first robin winter song of the year at dawn today!)

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      1. Oh here’s a fun fact about the name “robin”. Well I guess yours were named by the European settlers for sharing the red plumage with ours, so the story still matches.

        So in Olde Englande, they had a habit of giving birds nicknames. So the blue tit was called Tom Tit; the wren, Jenny wren; and the redbreast, Robin redbreast. So the original name was redbreast, and somehow, the nickname robin ended up becoming its official name. Which would have then carried over to your robin.

        I’ve just looked up the song, and I have to say our blackbirds are the winner haha. Their songs are more varied and have a richer tone. But your robins are still nice!

        I trained one of our blackbirds to say “wee yoo wee yoo” like an alarm. He was super tame and he seemed to understand when I pointed to where I’d put his mealworms for the day. But he was mauled and killed by a cat 😥

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          1. That was super cute! British robins are very easy to tame, but the continental ones are shyer. They’re the same species, they just behave differently.

            Hoppy got an infection and died. I wish I’d tried to catch him and get him to my vet, but I didn’t know they treat wild birds too.

            I definitely have more photos, but I’m still archiving my 2009 posts, so it might be a while before I post them!

            What’s your favourite out of all your feathered visitors?

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            1. Great story! Too bad you won’t be on WordPress much longer. Leaving a comment on Blogger is painful. No like button either.

              My favourite feathered visitors? The robins are cheerful and friendly – they hop along behind me when I dig in the garden – picking up any tidbits I might have unearthed. The year the Great Horned Owl raised a family in our front yard was extra special! We’ve had Cooper’s Hawks nest in our woods too. The only downside to having raptors is that the smaller birds tend not to hang around much.

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              1. Haha so your robins do behave rather like our robins then! Ours used to but then I discovered no-dig gardening. I leave out mealworms for them anyway.

                Having raptors is a good sign that your songbird population is healthy, but I’m kinda glad ours isn’t so much. I get too attached to my birdie friends. I’ve seen a few passing through over the years, but any raptor setting up home here would die of starvation.

                I’ll still be around. I have a couple of other blogs I run on WP and as long as I can access the old editor I’ll keep them around. They’re more limited it their scope, so once they’re done, they’re done, so the back of house won’t matter too much. But for my main one I just feel that I’d rather have to sift through 14 years of content than 20, you know? I would have switched back to a .org but I have to be stingy with my money for now. Maybe one day. Blogger’s not ideal but the UI isn’t full of pointless gimmicks.

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