‘Rona Virus – Going the Distance

We’re All in This Together – but in an Apples to Oranges kind of way. Just look at Social Distancing regulations!

WHO (the World Health Organization),  China, Denmark, Hong Kong, and Singapore – 1 metre or 3 feet apart.
Australia, Belgium, Germany, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal and Spain – 1.5 metres.
USA – CDC says 6 feet or 2 meters. Canada, New Zealand and the UK – 2 metres.

Face Masks: There are countries who have a long standing face mask culture, and countries that don’t. In Japan, “The wearing of cloth or paper “sickness masks” while healthy and in public has become such a standard practice in Japan that in average years, the nation manufactures 4.3 billion face masks for personal use. … “sickness masks” have morphed into a trendsetting statement worn by celebrities and fashionistas. – National Review –

In other countries, surgical quality face masks are in short supply. The manufacture of hand made cloth face-masks has become a vibrant cottage industry (and a trendsetting statement.)

The Second Leg of the Cornonavirus Triple Crown (Warning – one swear word)

Should We Open our Community?

This gem was in my email inbox – what the medical people have concluded:
The Allergists were in favor of scratching it,
but the Dermatologists  advised not to make any rash moves.
The Gastroenterologists had sort of a gut feeling about it,
but the Neurologists thought the Administration had a lot of nerve.
Meanwhile, Obstetricians felt certain everyone was laboring under a misconception,
while the Ophthalmologists considered the idea farsighted.
Many Pathologists yelled, “Over my dead body!”.
while the Pediatricians said, “Let’s grow up!”
Psychiatrists  thought the whole idea was madness,
while the Radiologists  could see right through it.
Surgeons decided to wash their hands of the whole thing
and the Internists claimed it would indeed be a bitter pill to swallow.
The Plastic Surgeons opined that this proposal would “put a whole new face on the matter.”
The Podiatrists thought it was a step forward,
but the Urologists were pissed off at the whole idea.
Anesthesiologists thought the whole idea was a gas,
and those lofty Cardiologists  didn’t have the heart to say no.
In the end, the Proctologists won out by suggesting that we leave the entire decision up to the assholes in Government.

No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.
– Edmund Burke –

Social scientists have found that when confronted with either an enormous threat or a huge reward, people tend to focus on the magnitude of the consequence and ignore the probability.
– The Politics of Fear, Al Gore, CBS News –

I have a second Part to my blog. It is called Counter Current. It is the home for all things (mostly issues) that I’ve researched.

If it leans politically, it is way right of the far left, and way left of the far right.

If you choose to leave a comment, I understand that we may have a difference of opinion. That is okay with me, because what our world needs right now is the free flow of thoughts and ideas to counter the movement that tries to restrict free speech. Mass and social media has done more to damage our relationships with people ‘not just like us’ than anyone realizes.

If Tom Cruise Ran for President (Video)

If Tom Cruise Ran for President – Actor: MILES FISHER: https://linktr.ee/milesfisher

Other Things I Found this Month while Surfing the Internet:

Understanding Engineers:
– Percussive Maintenance: I hit it and it started working
– Cycle Power to the Panel: Turn it off and on again
– High Impedance Air-Gap: I forgot to plug it in
– Organic Grounding: I got electrocuted
– Thermally Reconfigured: It melted
– Kinetic Disassembly: It blew up
– Thermal Shock: It burned

 

 

 

 

 

Speculations about the Chicken

This post is dedicated to the Chicken Grandma.

Why did the chicken cross the road? To get to the other side.
Why did the duck cross the road?  It was the chicken’s day off.
Why did the chicken cross the playground? To get to the other slide.

If the following people were to answer the question of why the chicken crossed the road, this might be how they would respond. (Source: the Internet.)

ISACC NEWTON: Chickens at rest tend to stay at rest. Chickens in motion tend to cross the road.

DONALD TRUMP: I’ve been told by my many sources, good sources – they’re very good sources – that the chicken crossed the road. All the Fake News wants to do is write nasty things about the road, but it’s a really good road. It’s a beautiful road. Everyone knows how beautiful it is.

JOE BIDEN: Why did the chicken do the…thing in the…you know the rest.

BARACK OBAMA: Let me be perfectly clear, if the chickens like their eggs they can keep their eggs. No chicken will be required to cross the road to surrender her eggs. Period.

DICK CHENEY: Where’s my gun?

AL SHARPTON: Why are all the chickens white?

DR. PHIL: The problem we have here is that this chicken won’t realize that he must first deal with the problem on this side of the road before it goes after the problem on the other side of the road. What we need to do is help him realize how stupid he is acting by not taking on his current problems before adding any new problems.

ANDERSON COOPER: We have reason to believe there is a chicken, but we have not yet been allowed to have access to the other side of the road.

DR SEUSS: Did the chicken cross the road? Did he cross it with a toad? Yes, the chicken crossed the road, but why it crossed I’ve not been told.

ERNEST HEMINGWAY: To die in the rain, alone.

GRANDPA: In my day we didn’t ask why the chicken crossed the road. Somebody told us the chicken crossed the road, and that was good enough for us.

ARISTOTLE: It is the nature of chickens to cross the road.

ALBERT EINSTEIN: Did the chicken really cross the road, or did the road move beneath the chicken?

COLONEL SANDERS: Did I miss one?

‘Rona Virus Alberta and COVID-19 – Facts Amid the Fears

Mass and Social Media have done a good job of making people highly fearful of COVID-19. However, as we learn more about the virus, statistics and studies support a less fearful scenario.

The media dwells on case counts but it is becoming obvious that confirmed cases are mostly mild and don’t, in fact, represent the number of actual cases. Many cases may have gone undetected because people didn’t have symptoms or didn’t seek testing. (If officials don’t know how many cases there actually are, how can they say what the COVID death or survival rate is?)

Here are the statistics in Alberta that I think are more important and less fearful:

1. The most significant metric of Covid is how many people died. Covid deaths to date are a very small percentage of both the population and of Alberta deaths per year. Covid deaths are less than 2 times greater than the flu season of 2017-2018, which was a high severity flu season.
– Deaths from all causes in Alberta in 2019: 26,972
– Covid-19 deaths to August 9, 2020: 213 (.0036% of Alberta’s Population of 4,428,247)
– Lab Confirmed flu deaths in the 2017-2018 flu season: 92

2. Another important metric is the number of hospitalizations. The 2017-2018 flu season (high severity) had significantly more hospitalizations than Covid. Covid Hospitalizations peaked in late April and have not reached a level anywhere near the capacity of Alberta’s health-care system.
– Covid Hospitalizations: 598 (.0091% of the population)
– Hospitalizations in the 2017-2018 flu season: 3047

3. The vast majority of Covid deaths were Seniors over the age of 80. The Average age at death was 83. Ninety one percent of the deaths were people over 70 years of age.
– Deaths 80+ years and older: 148
– Deaths 70-79 years of age: 46
– Deaths 70+ years and older: 194 ( 91% of the deaths)

4. Ninety percent of the people who died had 2 or more comorbidities. Officials have not said whether there is a distinction between death caused by Covid and death caused by the comorbidity but Covid was present.
– Deaths with 2 or more comorbidities: 179 (90% of the deaths)
Comorbidities include: Diabetes, Hypertension, COPD, Cancer, Dementia, Stroke, Liver cirrhosis, Cardiovascular diseases (including IHD and Congestive heart failure), Chronic kidney disease, and Immuno-deficiency.

5. Data and studies point to new assumptions that differ from those held at the beginning of the  Covid-19 pandemic:

– The perceived risk of transmission from contaminated surfaces is lower than it was earlier in the pandemic when not much was known about the coronavirus. (Linsey Marr, expert in the transmission of viruses, Virginia Tech, studies of the survival of COVID-19 on surfaces)

– The vast majority of transmission seems to be through close contact with an infected individual, primarily in an indoor setting. (Dr. Isaac Bogoch, infectious disease physician, Toronto General Hospital.)

Wearing gloves for extended stretches while touching various objects can lead to cross-contamination the longer you’re wearing them which winds up being less helpful than just washing or sanitizing your bare hands regularly. (Infectious disease specialist Dr. Zain Chagla, associate professor, McMaster University in Hamilton.)

Playgrounds are probably one of the safer places for kids to congregate, if they have to congregate. And the reason why is that sunlight kills off the virus pretty effectively(Linsey Marr, expert in the transmission of viruses, Virginia Tech, studies of the survival of COVID-19 on surfaces)

– Public health authorities define a significant exposure to Covid-19 as face-to-face contact within 6 feet with a patient with symptomatic Covid-19 that is sustained for at least a few minutes (and some say more than 10 minutes or even 30 minutes). The chance of catching Covid-19 from a passing interaction in a public space is therefore minimal. (New England Journal of Medicine, Universal Masking in Hospitals)

– The absolute risk of infection from an exposed individual was 12.8% at 1 m and 2.6% at 2 m. (From a Study of observational papers, published in The Lancet, June 1, 2020)

– We therefore strongly support the calls of public health agencies for all people to wear masks when circumstances compel them to be within 6 ft of others for sustained periods. (New England Journal of Medicine, Universal Masking in Hospitals)

– Recent data suggests that the human body reacts no differently to this virus than to other respiratory viruses: it mounts immunity, and once achieved, the virus gets cleared and there is protection from future infection. (Dr. Neil Rau infectious diseases specialist, medical microbiologist, Oakville, Ont.)

– Increased infections, as long as they do not involve the elderly or medically vulnerable, are an unavoidable path to herd immunity. Our “flattening of the curve” has once again proven the axiom: “You can pay me now or pay me later.” Holding out for a vaccine is impractical and likely naive, in light of previous vaccine failures with other coronaviruses. (George Delgado, MD, Covid Planning Tools)

Unintended Consequences of Putting Safety First (Video)

In this video, Mike Rowe refers to a piece he wrote called “Safety Third,” which explored the “unintended consequences of a culture that truly elevates safety to an unrealistic place on some hierarchy.” He explains:

Were safety truly “first,” no level of risk would ever be encouraged or permitted, and no work would ever get done. Or play, for that matter.”

Just yesterday, 24,000 people died of starvation. The same will happen tomorrow, and the day after tomorrow, and the day after that. Over nine million a year die of hunger related illnesses. Why is this not a global emergency? Why doesn’t cable news report these tragic deaths every minute of every day, like they do with this virus (Covid-19)?

Over the last few weeks, we’ve been inundated with facts (about Covid), but very little context or perspective. And that lack of context is prompting more and more people to ask the same question I posed here last week – what if the cost of the cure is greater than the cost of the disease? It’s not an unreasonable question, or a heartless one, but people don’t like to hear it.

– Mike Rowe –