11th Anniversary of Blogging

I reached my 11 year Blogging Milestone at the beginning of November. Though that is a long time compared to the longevity of many blogs, my output has been only 1000 posts. Many bloggers I know consistently deliver an interesting post a day! If I had been able to do that, I would have authored 4,015 posts in 11 years!

I was on a mission last year to reach 1000 posts on my 10th Blogging Anniversary but came up short by 78 posts. This year I wanted to have 1111 posts… drat, short by 111 posts… I think I’m going backwards.

This Anniversary I’d like to thank all the readers and fellow bloggers who have made the ‘Year of the ‘Rona Virus’ tolerable. Your stories have lifted my spirits. They have taken my mind to far flung places while my body was in lock down!

Sadly, some of you dropped out of sight. I worry about you, especially if you are senior citizens. You have triple jeopardy – the virus itself, the worry about the virus and the loneliness of isolation. Quadruple jeopardy if your sinuses don’t take well to masking. Quintuple if you are a political conservative. Sextuple if you are a white male. Septuple if… well, you get the idea.

I’ll wrap up this Anniversary post with a few punny thoughts about blogging. Groan if you must…

As a blogger, I constantly feel cold, probably because I’m surrounded by so many drafts.

I avoid using apostrophes in my blogging. They are too possessive.

Is there a blogger whose creative life hasn’t been punctuated with slow writing periods?

My editor once criticized my blog. He said that double negatives were a “no-no.”

Sometimes I run out of blogging ideas. That’s when I go to the fabric store and find new material.

The left side of my blog is completely missing, but it’s all right now.

We bloggers are sometimes deep thinkers. For example, if pencils came with erasers at both ends, what would be the point?

While doing research for a blog on sign language, nothing handy came up, at least nothing I could put my finger on.

Would a blog about transcendentalism require Thoreau editing?

Dislike Vs Hate Quotations

Dislike and Hate – how do they differ? Dislike is a feeling of aversion. Hate is an emotion of extreme hostility.

I really, really dislike Brussels Sprouts and cleaning toilets. I can’t think of anything I hate.

How about you – anything you strongly dislike so much that you feel hostile towards it?

A man who lives, not by what he loves but what he hates, is a sick man.
– Archibald MacLeish –

“And what problem does your hate solve?” he would ask us.
– Dr. SunWolf, professorsunwolf.com –

Dislike of another’s opinions and beliefs neither justifies our own nor makes us more certain of them: and to transfer the repugnance to the person himself is a mark of a vulgar mind.
– John Lancaster Spalding –

Hate is too great a burden to bear. It injures the hater more than it injures the hated.
– Coretta Scott King –

Haters are the people who will broadcast your failures and whisper your success.
– Will Smith –

Hating people is like burning down your own house to get rid of a rat.
– Harry Emerson Fosdick –

He has all of the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire.
– Winston Churchill –

I am not a vegetarian because I love animals; I am a vegetarian because I hate plants.
– A. Whitney Brown –

I don’t hate anyone. The only people I know well enough to hate, I love.
– Robert Brault, rbrault.blogspot.com –

I do know how to treat people and that is treat them the way I want to be treated. So when I extend that respect and that consideration that I would like to have, there is a certain amount of reciprocating. Some of the senators have even said words to the effect to me of “I can’t dislike you as much as I wish that I did”.
– Ernie Chambers –

I hate housework! You make the beds, you do the dishes and six months later you have to start all over again.
– Joan Rivers –

I like a woman with a head on her shoulders. I hate necks.
– Steve Martin –

I’m free of all prejudices. I hate everyone equally.
– W. C. Fields –

I never yet heard man or woman much abused, that I was not inclined to think the better of them; and to transfer any suspicion or dislike, to the person who appeared to take delight in pointing out the defects of a fellow-creature.
– Jane Porter –

Isn’t it kind of silly to think that tearing someone else down builds you up?
– Sean Covey –

I think that everybody wants to be heard, and the easiest way to be the loudest is to be the hater.
– ​Tavi Gevinson –

Love me or hate me, both are in my favour. If you love me, I will always be in your heart, and if you hate me, I will be in your mind.
– Qandeel Baloch –

Oh, you hate your job? Why didn’t you say so? There’s a support group for that. It’s called everybody, and they meet at the bar.
– Drew Carey –

Success makes so many people hate you. I wish it wasn’t that way. It would be wonderful to enjoy success without seeing envy in the eyes of those around you.
– Marilyn Monroe –

There is a story of an Oxford student who once remarked, “I despise all Americans, but have never met one I didn’t like.”
– Gordon Allport –

We can’t control the filters that others choose when they look at us.
– Rachel Wolchin –

We make up any excuse to preserve myths about people we love, but the reverse is also true; if we dislike an individual we adamantly resist changing our opinion, even when somebody offers proof of his decency, because it’s vital to have myths about both the gods and devils in our lives.
– Marlon Brando –

When you really know somebody you can’t hate them. Or maybe it’s just that you can’t really know them until you stop hating them.
– Orson Scott Card –

The Effects of Lockdowns – Scott W. Atlas

I think we can all understand why the initial lockdown was done, as I mentioned. Once the fatality rate projections actually are data instead of projections, when we see what’s going on, when we know who to protect, which we can talk about, we understand the really disastrous consequences of what the continuation of the initial lockdown is doing…

…We’re in a world where social media is an igniter of really outrageous statements and reactions and instantaneous things, and we’re in a world where anyone who can do a Google search thinks they’re an expert, so we hear a lotta people pontificating about medications, about side effects. They don’t have any medical perspective whatsoever. The news is sensationalizing. One example was this idea that children get this rare entity called Kawasaki syndrome, or it’s similar to that. This is extremely rare, but this was the headline for over a week, really. The reality is that doctors understand that there are rare exceptions that are very dangerous in virtually every disease. The rare exceptions do not change the overwhelming amount of data. Yet that carried the day, so there’s this sort of reactive fear that has entered into the public policymaking…

…There’s no such policy as stopping COVID-19 at all cost. That was never the policy even of the Trump team of Fauci and Birx in the beginning. That was never the stated policy, but it has devolved into that sort of thinking, where we must stop all COVID-19 at all cost. Somehow, the public, because of that policy, has become so fearful that now they buy into that policy. So I think that’s lesson number two, know the impact of the policies themselves. At least be able to judge that before you start implementing really severe, in this case draconian, public policy.
– Scott W. Atlas, Interview Hoover Institution

 It’s useful if you have a theory to think through the worst possible consequences of its application, right? It’s a good antidote to ideological possession. It’s like, well, just for a minute, imagine that your theory could go spectacularly wrong. What would that look like?
– Jordan Peterson

This is the Week That Was: Amazon, Time, Invention of Ikea (Video)

Andy Amazon

I, however, am expecting those craft supplies…

If it wasn’t for the delivery guys, our social life would be almost zilch.

The only upside to Covid is that many retailers have made online shopping really easy! We don’t need to drive anywhere, delivery is quick and products are available that aren’t always stocked in the local stores.  What’s not to like!

The King/Queen of online shopping is Amazon. It has more than 2.5 million retailers selling on the Amazon marketplace (according to Marketplacepulse, 2019).

We ventured out last week to buy a new kitchen tap set at Home Depot.  They were out of stock, but we could order online from them. Delivery was in one to three weeks. Amazon had the same product for the same price and it was delivered two days later… though it might take The Car Guy one to three weeks to decide whether he is going to call the plumber to do the install.

IKEA

How did IKEA come up with their business and marketing plan? Dude Dad has this very funny explanation!

Too Early for Christmas?

This ‘Lest We Forget’ admonishment arrived in my Facebook feed a few days after I had put up my Christmas Tree. I’m not really sure how decorating for Christmas implies disrespect for anything, but if that is what some people feel, then they have every right to feel that way…

…and I have every right to do what feels right for me. Hence the tree. Right now it is the brightly lit beacon in the corner of the living room that dispels the late afternoon gloom that came after we changed the clocks.

My previous post about time change was:  Daylight Saving Time.

My Remembrance Day Posts were:
Lest We Forget
Belgium – WWI Memorial – A Brooding Soldier
In Flanders Fields – Canadians in World War One

This was from this past spring. Turns out that 4 months wasn’t forward enough.

We Have the Right

To Remove ‘Do Not Remove’ Stickers

Thanks to Tim Allen (on Twitter) for featuring this poster from iFixit.

iFixit is a site that wants to help people repair things. They are building a free repair manual for every device – a monumental undertaking, but they are making great progress. They rate how easy it is to repair smart phones, tablets and laptops – and they also have sections on appliances, cameras, vehicles and many more.

Our stuff used to be made to last. Now it’s made to last only a couple of years. Repair is green. It keeps the stuff you love in service, and out of a landfill.
Products that can be repaired, should be repaired. Refurbished cell phones can be sold to someone new. Repaired computers bridge the digital divide. Even better, repair jobs are local. They won’t ever be shipped overseas.