Literary Origami – Bookworm and Snowflake

I did a DNA test and found out I’m 100% bookworm.
– Author Unknown –

This folded bookworm was a big disappointment. Too much big eyes and book, not enough worm. I’ll have to find a different pattern.
Would you know this was supposed to be a snowflake if I didn’t tell you it was supposed to be a snowflake?

Sadly, my socks are like snowflakes. No two are exactly alike.
– Graham Parke –


An Untrue Story that will Offend Everyone or No One.

Am I Preoccupied by Snow?

Glad you asked that. Yes, it is Winter here in Alberta and I have successfully completed sidewalk clearing duties during and after three snowstorms. If you don’t have snow, but wish to train in case you do get a snowstorm, be sure to watch the following:

Literary Origami – Book Fold Trees

Some people won’t dog-ear the pages… Favorite books should be naked, faded, torn, their pages spilling out. Love them like a friend, or at least a favorite toy. Let them wrinkle and age along with you.
– Ella Berthoud & Susan Elderkin –

Book Folding – ‘dog-earing’ taken to the extreme…

This folded book tree is a full circle. To prepare this book for folding, the two covers and spine cover are torn off.  Break the spine (ouch!) in numerous places to make it easier to form the folded book into a circle. Use a glue gun to join the spine edges together when the folding is complete. Glue on a ‘trunk’ – or not. It will stand by itself either way.
This book tree is a half circle. Leave the covers on. Break the spine in lots of places to make folding easier. If you want this book to stand on its own, then don’t glue on a ‘trunk’. I glued on a trunk and some buttons – I’ve hung it on a wall using a plate hanger.

Step by Step Instructions: (these show a book without a cover.)

Step 1 – Fold 1: Top right corner of the page folded to the middle of the book. Use a bone folder or back of a spoon to make the folds crisp.
Step 2 – Fold 2: Right side of the page folded to the middle.
Step 3 – Crease 1: this is a crease at the bottom of the page to mark where the folded page hangs down below the bottom edge of the book.
Step 4 – Fold 3: Unfold Fold 2 and fold the crease up that you made in Step 3
Step 5 – Refold Fold 2 with Fold 3 tucked under. Use clothes pegs or some other large clip to hold the folded pages out of the way.
This is what your tree looks like after the first few pages are folded. As you fold more pages, keep pressing the book open along the spine so that all folds align the same with the spine.

Decorating

Go Wild! The Full Circle Tree: I glued a bow onto the top and a ‘trunk’ cut from a small branch of a tree to the bottom. The Half Circle Tree – I glued a heavy Christmas paper to the inside of the covers. I added a bow to the top and a trunk to the bottom. I tied some crochet cotton onto buttons to make the bows, then glued them onto the tree.

All my other Literary Origami Posts are at Book Fold.

My other Book Fold Projects

Literary Origami Heart and Best Titles for Book Folding

If you think you’d like to try book folding, but don’t want to damage a good book, then you might want to choose one from the online lists of ‘The Worst Books Ever Written’. The following books seem to be particularly unpopular:
– The ‘Twilight’ series by Stephanie Meyer;
– The ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ series by E.L. James;
‘The Eye of Argon’ by Jim Theis;
– anything written by or about Miley Cyrus, Justin Bieber, Pamela Anderson, Sylvester Stallone, etc.
Valley of the Dolls – Jacqueline Susan
You’ve Been Warned by James Patterson
– any book with the word ‘Inconvenient’ in the title;
– books with however many Steps to Living a Better Life.

Asking a decent editor to save this book would have been like asking a doctor to help a corpse that had fallen from the top of the Empire State Building.
— The New Statesmen –

I ‘summarized’ this out of date self-help book about boundaries in marriage by folding a heart within a heart. I made a two layer paper quill heart to fill the inner heart.

Can you suggest any other books that would be suitable for craft projects?

Literary Origami – Book Fold Daisies, Spruce Tree, Rose Bowl

How to justify the (sort of) destructive craft of Book Folding:

There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.
– Charles Dickens –

I get most of the books that I fold from the used book section of our recycle depot. A self-congratulatory publication by a former leader of Canada’s Green Party was an excellent find – the paper was high quality… the same can often be said for self-help books.

The book above was a complicated project. It used 98 leaves of the book. The pages had to be measured carefully and folded in a very strict order. The Daisies are the ‘fringe flowers’ that I used in Folding the Letter M.

This book, a spruce tree, was a lot easier!

Dinosaurs didn’t read. Now they are extinct. Coincidence?
– Author Unknown –

This book was supposed to be a wine glass. When it was done it looked more like a pudding bowl. I found instructions for making Roses with book pages, added some leaves that I cut out with finely serrated pinking shears and vois là – I had turned the pudding bowl into a rose bowl.

Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.
― Groucho Marx, The Essential Groucho: Writings For By And About Groucho Marx –

My other folded books:

Literary Origami – Well, That’s a HOOT Book Fold!

OWL book folding, OWL quotes and OWL jokes! Read on!

Book Folding – I’ve done two Owl books. The first one is a stylized ‘HOO’.

This is the pattern I used for the ‘HOO’ book. In retrospect, I think I would use more pages to make the letters ‘H’ and ‘O’ and fewer pages to make the owl.

I am both a night owl and an early bird. So I am wise and I have worms.
– Steve Carell –

You can’t hoot with the owls and then soar with the eagles
– Hubert H. Humphrey –

For my second owl book, I made just the owl and added some ‘fringe flower’ eyes and ‘paper curl’ ear tufts and wings.

The Owl pattern

I have learned that one of the most important rules in politics is poise – which means looking like an owl after you have behaved like a jackass.
– Ronald Reagan –

The wife and I dressed as the iconic Peruvian owls for Halloween.
We were Inca hoots.
– Author Unknown –

A devoutly religious cowboy lost his favorite book of scripture while out mending fences one day.
A few weeks later, an owl walked up to him carrying the scripture book in its beak.
The cowboy couldn’t believe what was happening. He took his precious book from the owl’s beak and raised his eyes to the heavens.
He said, “It’s a miracle!”
“Not really,” said the owl. “Your name is written inside the cover.”
– Author Unknown –

These are my other Folded Books:

Literary Origami – The Dark Side of Book Folding – Skull and Goth Girl

I folded this book into a Skull for my daughter – for Halloween. I should have used a thicker book and made some cross bones too.

I live inside your face.
– Author Unknown –

Why is the human skull as dense as it is? Nowadays we can send a message around the world in one-seventh of a second, but it takes years to drive an idea through a quarter-inch of human skull.
– Charles Kettering –

I folded this book into a Gothy figure (for the same daughter) – for Christmas. I was going to embroider some dark skulls to decorate the cape and body, but that was going to take more time than I had. Instead, The Car Guy made some black epoxy resin snowflakes!

I had choosen the path of the black sheep rather than that of the unicorns and puppies.
– Magenta Periwinkle, Cutting Class –

I turned my bedroom into a bat-cave of band posters, dark curtains, and the occasional skull. I think by now my distraught parents were seeking advice from their pastor. Andy, meanwhile, calmly remarked, “I like how you’ve found a way to use Halloween decorations year-round.”
– Molly Ringle, All the Better Part of Me –

The Daughter loved both books – she is a nurse. If you have a nurse in your family, you know that their interests, stories and sense of humour can sometimes be – different.

Or maybe it is day shift explaining to night shift… either way, it was probably a ‘shit’ show, as they say.

If you know a nurse or a doctor or a person who works in a medical facility, be sure to let them know that you appreciate what they do! And when they get to telling you the story about the patient who… well, I won’t go there. So just listen and nod and smile, like they do, when you talk about gardening or other such things that don’t involve body parts and fluids.

Literary Origami – Book Fold Letter ‘M’ and Fringe Flowers

The Marvelous letter ‘M’ at work:
My mother makes a mouthwatering mincemeat muffin.
Most monsters make messes.
Many merry maids milked many moody milk cows.

How many ‘M’s can you use in one sentence?

The Letter M – one row up, one row down, one row up, one row down!
The Letter M with curls and flowers

Directions:

Height of book: 9 inches
Number of pages used: 234 Pages (117 leaves)

First 12 folds:   1.5 inches from bottom
Row 1:   24 folds starting at bottom; first fold 1.5 inches from bottom; remaining folds .25 inches from each previous fold
Row 2:   23 folds starting at top; first fold .25 inches closer to bottom than last folds in Row 1; remaining folds .25 inches from previous fold
Row 3:   23 folds starting at bottom; first fold 1.5 inches from bottom; remaining folds .25 inches from previous fold
Row 4:   23 folds starting at top; first fold .25 inches closer to bottom than last fold in Row 1
Last 12 folds:   1.5 inches from bottom

Fringe Flowers:

There are quite a few web sites with instructions for fringe flowers. This is one of them: Exotic Fringed Flowers.

 

Literary Origami – As the Month Unfolded I Folded Easy Angles

We’re at the Bland Beige House in Arizona now. The weather here has been much better than Alberta – where the temperatures turned brutally cold soon after we headed south.

I haven’t been feeling at my best for a few months – interesting how life can throw you a medical curve ball and recovery takes more time and effort just because you are older!

The up side of feeling down is it gives you more ‘down time’. I spent some of it folding this book, which is the easiest book fold project I’ve done so far. I call it Easy Angles.

I ‘spruced it up’ by adding a black paper background on the two end pages, and some curls (See ‘How to make curly hair’ at Book Fold Angel.)

Instructions:
1. My book was 9 inches high. (22.8 cm) I used 176 pages, which is 88 book leaves.

2. The design consists of 4 ‘rows’. Each row takes 22 leaves.

3.The first fold (bottom fold) in each row is 1.75 inches (4.5 cm) from the bottom of the page.

4. The second fold in each row is 2 inches from the bottom of the page. (If you prefer to work in metric, pick a nice round number for each dimension.)

5. The third fold in each row is 2.25 inches from the bottom of the page.

6. Continue in .25 inch increments for the 22 folds.

7. When you have completed the 22 folds of the first row, start the second row… then the third, and then the last row.

8. If you want more rows than 4, then you either need a book with more pages or…
you could make fewer than 22 folds per row.

9. If your book is less than 9 inches high, you can either make fewer folds per row or…
you could make make each fold less than .25 inches from the previous fold.

Easy Peasy, right!

Do you know where ‘Easy Peasy Lemon Squeezy’ comes from? In a 1970’s British TV commercial for Lemon Squeezy detergent, a little girl and an adult use Lemon Squeezy detergent to clean a stack of dishes quickly. At the end of the commercial the girl says “Easy Peasy Lemon Squeezy”.

My Other Book Folding Posts:

Book Folding – Literary Origami

Book Folding 101

Folded Book Angel

Book Fold Angel – Decorated

Book Folding 202 – A Paw Print

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

 

 

Literary Origami – Book Folding 202 A Paw Print

The following is my attempt to further explain Book Folding. I say attempt, because writing instructions is actually quite difficult. I have a new found appreciation for people who write manuals…

Paw Print

The Basics of Book Folding are covered in this post: Book Folding 101. Here is a video that will help you visualize what I explained in that post and what I am explaining below: DIY Marta. Though Marta isn’t the greatest at making videos, she is a big help in understanding what the process is. (I don’t do everything just like she does – but close enough.)

Moving on. In Book Folding 202, I’ll tell you how you use a printed Paw Print design. (If you have never folded a book before, use a practice book to test to see if you are on the right track…

1. Here is the pattern for the the Paw Print. If you right click on the image you can download it. Save it as a .jpg file and print it full size on an 8.5X11 sheet of paper. This should give you a paw print that is about 4 inches high.

2. If you use the pattern as printed, you will need a book that is  about 8 inches high and has at least 200 numbered pages, which gives you 100 leaves of paper. (1 sheet or leaf of paper has two numbered pages.)

3. Each line on the pattern represents one leaf of the book (two numbered pages) – but only where there is one element, like the left and right toes where there isn’t a second element (the foot pad) below it.

4. Where there are two elements (the toe and the foot pad), you will use two leaves per line on the pattern.

So, although this paw print pattern looks like it only needs 60 leaves, you are actually going to need a book with at least 99 leaves (200 pages). The top element is always folded on one leaf, the bottom element is folded on the next leaf.

Fold Line at the top of the pattern. Elements of the pattern: four toes and the foot pad.

5. Once you decide how the paw print will be positioned on the page (lets say the top of the paw is 2 inches down from the top of the book), then you will fold the paper pattern on a fold line that is 2 inches above the top of the paw print (see ‘Fold Line’ above). You will align this fold line with the top of each leaf of the book.

In the photo below, you can see how the pattern was folded on the fold line. The folded over piece of the pattern creates a ledge that makes it easy to align the pattern on every page.

 

6. The photo above shows the pattern if you were at about the half way point of folding. You can see that the toe and the foot pad are both shown on a single line of the pattern.

7. The toe element will be made with two folds on one leaf – from points #1 and #2. The foot pad will be folded on the next leaf from points #3 and #4. (The top element is always folded first.)

8. You can either make the folds directly from the pattern, or you can make pencil marks on each leaf, remove the pattern, then fold. Either method works. Put a tick mark on the pattern to show what you have finished folding or marking.

9. Folding always starts at the front of the book, but there will probably be some unfolded pages at the beginning and end of the book. So, to find the first leaf you will need to:
a. find the middle of the book.
b. take the number of leaves that you need (99), divided by 2 which gives you 50 leaves. Count back 50 leaves from the middle of the book to the front of the book. That will give you your starting point.

Clear as mud?

Literary Origami – Book Fold Angel Decorated

The Book Fold Angel is finished. I added curly paper hair, a halo, and a ribbon around the neck.

How to Make the Curly Hair

A paper strip with three lines of print and a gluing tab on the right side. When the paper is curled there will be three curly locks!

I used two book pages to make the hair. I trimmed the margins off of the top, bottom and one side of the page, and left a small margin on the other side (for gluing.)

Then I cut between the lines, leaving the gluing tab uncut until I got to the third line. Then I cut through the gluing tab too. This gave me strips with three lines of print to each strip.

I used scissors to curl each line, just like you do with curling ribbon. This gave me three curls per strip.

I folded the gluing tab so it was at a 90 degree angle to the curly bits. Then I glued the tabs to the head of the angel (used a glue gun).

The Halo

The halo was a plastic ring that I wrapped in ribbon. I glued a toothpick to the ring, then stuck the toothpick into the head after the hair was finished.

OOPS!

If you want the hair to match the colour of the Angel, use pages from the Angel book. I didn’t do that, unfortunately. I used a different book. My first batch of hair was much whiter in colour – and I didn’t really appreciate the effect that had until after I had glued some of the hair on. For the second batch of hair, I used a page from a book that had slightly yellower pages. When I mixed that hair in with the white hair, it all kind of evened out. Sort of… Over time, I expect the whiter hair will turn yellow too.

I’ve learned that mistakes can often be as good a teacher as success.
– Jack Welch –

Book Folding Directions

Here is the ‘how to’ folding post: Literary Origami – Book Fold Angel.

Here is the ‘how to’ for book folding in general: Book Folding 101.