Where is the Letter ‘A’?

I have been sorting through photos, both the paper ones in boxes and the digital ones on my computer. It has been a big task that makes me wish I had developed a file naming or sorting system that was more descriptive than, for example, ‘UK’ – which has 79 sub-folders. It will take some time to sort through over 1500 folders and move them into more suitable descriptive locations. It has been fun, though, to revisit the past and in the process I’ve stumbled upon the fact that there are Letters of the Alphabet  in many of my photos.

Can you find the shape of the Letter ‘A’ in the photos below?

Windermere British Columbia
Stolen Church, Windermere, British Columbia

Hint: – look at the three windows, and the front door!

Fun Facts about the Letter ‘A’:

Which common English words have the most “a’s” in them?
The 6 letter word ‘banana’ and the 8 letter word ‘caragana’ can both boast being 50% ‘a’.

If plan A doesn’t work, the alphabet has 25 more letters.
― Original Author Unknown –

Did you find an ‘A’ in each of the photos? I’ve posted the answers at Photos Containing the Letter ‘A’.

Bobcats and Cottontail Rabbits in Arizona

Arizona
In my Arizona back yard – a Cottontail Rabbit

Hallo, Rabbit,” he said, “is that you?”
“Let’s pretend it isn’t,” said Rabbit, “and see what happens.”
― A.A. Milne –

Also in Arizona, in a neighbour’s front yard – a Bobcat

Please tell me you did not just say, “Here Kitty Kitty…”

Any wildlife visitors in your yard lately?

Utah – Calf Creek Overlook – Highway 12

537 - Utah landscape-1

Utah Highway

Calf Creek Overlook on  Scenic Byway 12, south of Boulder, Utah.

In 2002, State Route 12 was designated an “All-American Road.” Spanning 122 miles, and connecting Capitol Reef National Park and Bryce Canyon National Park, it took almost 40 years (from the ’40s to the ’80s) to complete construction. The scenic byway crosses some of the most magnificent scenery on the Colorado Plateau: red-rock desert, mesas, buttes, cliffs, and even lush mountain forests.
– Matador Network –

Utah has the largest open-pit mine in the world. Visible from outer space, the Kennecott Copper Mine is nearly a mile deep and 2.5 miles wide. The mind is still in production and it takes trucks more than two hours to drive from the bottom to the top.
– National Geographic –

In the Fishlake National Forest in Utah, a giant has lived quietly for the past 80,000 years. The Trembling Giant, or Pando, is a enormous grove of quaking aspens that takes the “forest as a single organism” metaphor and literalizes it: the grove really is a single organism. Each of the approximately 47,000 or so trees in the grove is genetically identical and all the trees share a single root system.
– Atlas Obscura –

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is Landscape.

Half Moon and Sunrises

moon Mar 31 2016
The photo challenge this week is Half-Light. At sunrise this morning, the moon appeared to be Half too!

The sun does not abandon the moon to darkness.
― Brian A. McBride, Dominion –

sunrise moon Arizona

Same time, same sunrise, same moon (that tiny white dot near the top right of the photo.

The sky is that beautiful old parchment in which the sun and the moon keep their diary.
– Alfred Kreymborg –

sunrise clouds Arizona

In Alberta, these clouds would probably mean rain. Here in Arizona, at this time of the year, dark clouds are just dark clouds.

The latest authority among men of science says that little is known of the causes which balance the clouds in the air. They are formed of water, and water, however minutely divided or blown into bubbles, is always heavier than the air. And yet these flying fountains of all the rivers of earth, these armed and thundering legions of the storm, that beat down the forests with hail and bury the mountains in snow, and flood the plains with water, go floating over us at vast heights with all their mighty magazines when all our philosophy would require them to sink to the earth.
– Daniel March, “The Balancings of the Clouds,” Our Father’s House, or the Unwritten Word, 1869 –

sunrise Arizona

Without clouds, sunrises aren’t nearly so dramatic!

There are no rules of architecture for a castle in the clouds.
– G.K. Chesterton –

What common phrases do you think of when you hear the word ‘Half’?

This weeks WordPress Photo Challenge is Half-Light.

Weather – Pondering Alberta’s Four Seasons

I’m in Arizona this morning. It is springtime here and the first blooms have appeared on a few bushes. By this evening I will be back in Alberta. It has been a mild winter, but if anything in my yard has been fooled into thinking it is spring, it is sadly mistaken!

I’ve chosen the Mountain Ash tree at The Red House to show you the seasons in Alberta – which are summed up as follows:

In Canada we have: Six months of winter, and six months of poor sledding. These can be broken down into: almost winter, winter, still winter and road construction season. To be more specific, the four seasons are: June, July, August and Winter.
– Author Unknown –

Here are the photos and quotes that explain the seasons:


Mountain Ash – late spring

The principal function of March is to use up the winter weather that wouldn’t fit into February.
– Doug Larson –


Mountain Ash – Late Summer

Summers always fly – winters walk.
– Charles M. Schulz –


Mountain Ash – Fall Colors

Autumn is a season followed immediately by looking forward to spring.
– Doug Larson –


Mountain Ash – Early Winter

The problem with winter sports is that – follow me closely here – they generally take place in winter.
– Dave Barry –

What season are you enjoying (or not enjoying) right now? Do you have a favourite season?

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is Seasons.

Time and My Clock Walls – So Late So Soon

The QuipperyHow time has changed!  When I was young, a clock had hands and you learned how to ‘tell time’. We had only a few clocks in our house. One was in the kitchen, and I suppose there was an alarm clock for my parental units (but I don’t remember ever hearing it ring.) I didn’t really pay attention to what time is was. Grown-ups did that for me. I just did what they told me to do when they told me to do it – mostly. If no one was telling me where to be or what to do, I let the sun and a rumble in my stomach guide me.

Today we are surrounded by clocks. They reside in every conceivable appliance. This has a cost though – a microwave oven can consume more electricity powering its digital clock than it does heating food! Of course, most wall clocks are battery powered – but  how much do you spend on batteries in a year?

How many clocks do you have to reset when Daylight Saving’s Time rolls around? The Car Guy says we have more than 20 clocks at The Red House! I’ve been making it easier for him to find many of those clocks. I’ve gathered them up and put them onto “Clock Walls”. The only downside to this is that Segal’s Law comes into play – Margy with one clock thinks she knows what time it is. Margy with two clocks is not quite sure.

There are fast clocks, there are slow clocks, there is one clock that is broken and it is only right twice a day…

This wall of clocks is ‘Memories Time’ – one clock is a gift from a daughter, one that The Car Guy’s dad made, one from the Middle East, one we saved from the flood at the cabin, one from a good friend, and one that a craftsman made from a slab of wood.

This week, the WordPress Photo Challenge is Time.

Trios, Triplet, Thirds – Photos of Three Things

Trio, triple, thirds say three.
As do triad, ternion and  trilogy,
Triptych, trine and trichotomy,
Triangle, treble and trinity.
– Margy –

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is Trio.  I had no problem finding photos to fit, as I often compose a shot to include three elements.

The idea of the number ‘3’ is also an important part of a photograph’s composition. The Rule of Thirds is perhaps not instinctive, nor obvious, yet it can make a dramatic difference in a photograph. Of course, rules are often broken. I was thinking Rule of Thirds when I cropped the following photos, but wasn’t that successful!

deep pink flower

Cactus blooms  – Arizona

Egret, great blue heron, black crowned night heron

Egret, Great Blue Heron and Black Crowned Night Heron – Sun Lakes Arizona

Cactus Arizona

Golden Barrel Cactus – Arizona

Alberta

Tall Grasses – my yard, Alberta, Canada

Carefree Arizona

Three word street sign – Carefree Arizona

brick building three arches

Building with Three arches – Jerome, Arizona

tree Alberta

Three spruce cones – my yard, Alberta, Canada

Before I was married I had three theories about raising children. Now I have three children and no theories.
– John Wilmot –

I suffer from entertaining anxiety… a fear that I can’t juggle the timing of three things alchemically transforming themselves in dangerously hot places.
– Dominique Browning –

People can be divided into three groups – those who make things happen, those who watch things happen and those who wonder what happened.
– John W. Newbern –

There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.
– Will Rogers –

The development of a new product is a three step process – first, an American firm announces an invention; second, the Russians claim they made the same discovery twently years ago; third, the Japanese start exporting it.
– Unknown –

There are three things I have learned never to discuss with people: religion, politics and the Great Pumpkin.
– Charles Schultz –

There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics.
– Mark Twain –

Three phrases that sum up Christmas are: Peace on Earth, Goodwill to Men, and Batteries not Included.
– Unknown –

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is: Trio.
Did you take part in this Photo Challenge?
Can you add any ‘three’ words to my poem at the top of the page?

Transition – Beep Beep Boop is Gone?

The dawn of a new day. If there are clouds, then a sunrise can be a remarkably beautiful transition from dark to light.

orange pink clouds Alberta

Perhaps our blogging hosts, WordPress.com, were thinking of dawn when they recently unveiled the New High Speed Editor. I certainly thought they had made a few improvements since they first introduced the ‘New Editor’. It loads so fast that the ever so unpopular, wait while I’m working, ‘Beep Boop Boop’ screen is gone!

Another plus – images can be dragged and dropped from your desktop right into your post. Unfortunately, the new editor is still in transition – the search feature for creating links to my old posts is missing.

How long will it take before this transitional editor is finished? Or will it ever be? Will we still have access to the good old editor that many or us prefer, or will it eventually disappear?

It is like asking, ‘Will there be a beautiful sunrise tomorrow morning’. No one really knows.

Light precedes every transition. Whether at the end of a tunnel, through a crack in the door or the flash of an idea, it is always there, heralding a new beginning.
– Teresa Tsalaky, The Transition Witness –

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is: Transition.