This is my Crone Voice

On one of my recent ‘wanderings’ I came across the word ‘Crone’ or more specifically, the Crone Archetype. Initially, I had a not so pleasant vision of a ‘Crone’, but further reading made me realize that some might say I AM a Crone! Perhaps you are too. (If you are a man, then your corresponding Archetype would be Sage.)

If you are a woman of a certain mature age, have abandoned the need for ‘properness’, are up front, and don’t mince your words – you might be a Crone. If you are seen as a being a straight talking mentor, occasionally a trifle crabby  and perhaps even  a bit flirtatious and sassy – you might be a Crone. If you have found an inner peace and accept who you are; if you are realistic and have practical expectations – you might be a crone.

I ticked off a lot of the ‘You might be a Crone’ boxes. When I reviewed the content of my blog, my ‘Crone Voice’ was evident in so many of the posts that had defied all my attempts to corral them into a single category. This was the birth of  My Crone Voice.

That resulted in a new Facebook Page, This is My Crone Voice. I began posting links to all my favourite stories from conservative, pragmatic environmentalist, climate change realist, garden variety, common sense folks like myself.

Apparently this alarmed an algorithm or actual person at Facebook, because within  a few weeks of starting the page, I was issued a warning that ‘Limits have been placed’.

I don’t know what these limits are, nor what I have done to deserve them. I can’t find any explanation or documentation other than this:

I’ve appealed it, of course. I pointed out to Facebook that I only have one follower, a Sage called The Car Guy,  and I only get one ‘Like’ on most posts. I don’t publish spam. I publish links to posts that I agree with.  I am not being misleading, fraudulent, or deceptive – unless those are the descriptors Facebook assigns to conservative pragmatic writers…

I eventually decided to delete the page. I’m getting real close to deleting Facebook from my life…

 

Ghost – A Satisfying Day at the ‘Gamma Dogs’ House

We recently became ‘Grandparents’ to a puppy, though the term ‘puppy’ seems odd for a dog that never was very small and is growing really quickly. Our daughter and her husband are taking their puppy, Ghost, to puppy classes and are making good progress in establishing themselves as the ‘Alpha Dogs’! This training is quickly forgotten, however, in the excitement of a day here at our rural Red House. We joke that I am so far down in the dog’s ‘hierarchy of obedience’ alphabet that I am the ‘Gamma Dog’.


“so many smells. i wonder if any of them are dog approved food.  ‘alpha dog lady’ didn’t like the dead gopher. i found here last week.”

“sniffing, running, digging, rolling.  i need. a bowl of water!”

“and I’m done. someone carry me to the car.”

This week’s WordPress.com Photo Challenge is Satisfaction.

Are you a dog owner? Or – do you just enjoy a dog when it visits, then get to send it home with the owners?

He said, “I Don’t Want the Chicken”

I’m helping my Dad downsize. He will probably be moving to smaller living quarters in the not too distant future. The ‘weeding’ process isn’t easy for him. He has a strong attachment to just about everything old in his apartment. His bonds to the distant past grow stronger, as the memories of the near past fade.

If he is willing to let me remove anything, it is only because he is very certain that a family member will take ownership of the item and treasure it as much as he does. Everything I have carted off so far is now safely stored in The Car Guys Garage, pending resettlement somewhere. The pile is fluid. Some of the things I put there last week must now go back to Dad’s place – a change of heart and mind.

As I was getting ready to haul another load down to my car yesterday, he suddenly said, “Take the chicken. I really don’t want that chicken.”

552-rooster-portugal-27

That surprised me. The chicken, (more accurately a Portuguese Good Luck Rooster, I suppose) sat in a place of prominence in his living room. I don’t know how he acquired it, but it was clear from the tone in his voice that he would be glad to see it go.

Since I know someone who might want the Rooster,  I put the bird on the handy catch-all ledge in my kitchen. A row of sharp knives is nearby – a rather appropriate reminder to the bird of the historical method of dispatching fowl, should the bird need to be kept in line.

As I look at all the ‘treasures’ that reside in my house, I think about which ones I would want to keep till ‘death us do part.’ What will be my ‘chicken’ when my children are carting some of my material memories out the door?

We all need some of the material things that provide continuity to our lives by always being there and always being the same.
– Andy Rooney –

Are you still in the accumulating stage of life, or have you started to downsize?

Knitting – Spare Time Crafting Stories

My mom was a knitter. She knit in her spare time – but she could knit in ‘unspare’ time too. By that, I mean she was a multitasker long before that term became popular. She could knit and watch TV. She could knit and enjoy the scenery on long road trips. She could knit and have conversations with friends. She probably could have knit and played bridge if Dad had built some sort of card holder for her.

green wool

My children are knitters too. Eldest daughter likes to knit in her spare time.

pink wool

Middle daughter likes to knit too. She takes her knitting on road trips (like her grandma). Last I heard she couldn’t multitask – she has to watch the progress of each and every stitch very carefully. If she doesn’t, she ‘drops stitches’ which is a knitters term that means a stitch got lost about 6 rows ago.

dog scarf

Youngest daughter knits, though I don’t think she has as much passion for that as she does for making lampwork glass beads (Beadlejuice Beads). The dog is a good model for knitted scarves, but not so good for glass bead necklaces and bracelets.

pantyhose craft
Me? If the love of knitting is passed down from generation to generation, it skipped mine. I don’t remember my mom even trying to teach me to knit. That task, which must have been an incredible challenge, was given to a no nonsense family friend, Norrie. Norrie tried to teach me European knitting and how to make Scottish Shortbread Cakes.

To Norrie’s and my credit, I did knit several sweaters. Bob, in the photo above, is wearing the first one I ever completed. I made it for The Car Guy while we were still dating. Bob has had the sweater on for just over an hour now, and that is the longest it has ever been worn. Enough said.

purple wool needles

knitting http://www.savagechickens.com/Over the years I did knit a few other things, but I can’t claim to enjoy it much. I like to buy wool, though. Sometimes I roll it into balls. Sometimes I even find a pattern and some needles. I might even think about knitting, but that is as far as I usually get!

Have you ever tried knitting? What do you like to do in your spare time?

This week’s WordPress.com photo Challenge is Spare.

This and That – Our Library, The Alphabet and a Good Crafting Intention

Our ‘Snowbird’ Community has a small Library. The volunteer librarians have developed a book filing system that theoretically allows them to house the largest number of books. The books are sorted by subject, then by size, then alphabetically by author’s name. This means that book cases with shorter paperback books have one more shelf than the taller hard cover book cases.

The problem with this system becomes apparent when the users want to find books by a particular author. Books by Stephen King, for example, can be found in 6 different locations – non-fiction, science fiction, fiction paperback, fiction hard cover, mystery paperback, and mystery hard cover. On any given day, the whim of the volunteer who shelves the book will determine where the book is.  This means that two hard cover copies of a single book will invariably be shelved in two different places.

Now and then, whole shelves of books will simply disappear. I’m assuming there were multiple copies of some books, and they were  donated to another little library. But in a system like this, it would be very time consuming to find duplicates. Suspiciously though, most of the books by my favourite British authors have disappeared…

This library really is an interesting example of how logic and good intentions can have unintended consequences.

Logic is a large drawer, containing some useful instruments, and many more that are superfluous. A wise man will look into it for two purposes, to avail himself of those instruments that are really useful, and to admire the ingenuity with which those that are not so, are assorted and arranged.
– Charles Caleb Colton, Lacon –

 

527-rudolphcorksI can appreciate what can happen to good intentions. Last Christmas I was going to make a whole herd of Cork Rudolphs. Their little bodies and heads would be etched with the ‘alphabet soup‘ of the wine world. Each little ungulate would be a reminder of  those special events when the wine flowed freely.

After many attempts, much oddly bent wire, and a bit of blood letting, a single reindeer was produced. Wine corks firmly resist any attempt to poke wires into them…

YOUR TURN: How do you organize your library? Do you alphabetize anything besides books?

This week, the WordPress Photo Challenge is Alphabet

Pets – The World According to Dogs – Purina Puppyhood (Video)

Have you read ‘The Art of Racing in the Rain‘ by Garth Stein? Garth’s website explains the story: “Enzo knows he is different from other dogs: a philosopher with a nearly human soul (and an obsession with opposable thumbs), he has educated himself by watching television extensively, and by listening very closely to the words of his master, Denny Swift, an up-and-coming race car driver.”

I am confident Enzo would want you to watch and read the following!

Here’s why I will be a good person. Because I listen. I cannot talk, so I listen very well. I never deflect the course of the conversation with a comment of my own… For instance, if we met at a party and I wanted to tell you a story about the time I needed to get a soccer ball in my neighbor’s yard but his dog chased me and I had to jump into a swimming pool to escape, and I began telling the story, you, hearing the words “soccer” and “neighbor” in the same sentence, might interrupt and mention that your childhood neighbor was Pele, the famous soccer player, and I might be courteous and say, Didn’t he play for the Cosmos of New York? Did you grow up in New York? And you might reply that, no, you grew up in Brazil on the streets of Tres Coracoes with Pele, and I might say, I thought you were from Tennessee, and you might say not originally, and then go on to outline your genealogy at length. So my initial conversational gambit – that I had a funny story about being chased by my neighbor’s dog – would be totally lost, and only because you had to tell me all about Pele. Learn to listen! I beg of you. Pretend you are a dog like me and listen to other people rather than steal their stories.
― Enzo the Dog in ‘The Art of Racing in the Rain’ by Garth Stein –

What dog wisdom would you like to add?

Cautionary Tales – Falling off the Roof and Securing a Pumpkin

We had two ‘Be Careful!’ events at the Red House this week. The first was when The Car Guy went up on the roof to check the chimneys and see if the gutters needed cleaning. I was truly torn as to whether I would go up there too. I’m okay going up the ladder. The transition from ladder to roof is a bit scary. I’m okay walking around the roof, as long as I stay at the peak. The transition from roof to ladder… that is the really hard part.

But, I did it, and really enjoyed looking at the yard below.

The second ‘Be Careful’ event was the transportation of the Pumpkins. They had to get from our house to the Family Pumpkin Carving Party, a trip of half an hour. I’d already given the pumpkins a lobotomy and didn’t want them rolling around the back of the JEEP. I also didn’t want them to turn into projectiles if we had to stop suddenly!

The Car Guy decided this was the best way to carefully secure pumpkin noggins for the trip.

I’ll love you til the end of vine.
– Source: PumpkinNook –

There are three things that I’ve learned never discuss with people: religion, politics, and the Great Pumpkin.
– Linus, ‘It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown’ –

chicken day after HalloweenSome of the stores already have Christmas product on their shelves! This reminded me that when we took apart our Christmas tree last year, it never quite made it back into the storage closet. I wanted to clean up that area, but the tree was in the way. What to do – put it away, or just put it back up in the Living Room… can you guess what I did?!

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge was Careful

Best Canadian Puns, Jokes and Observations – I Am Canadian (Video)

Sesquicentennial – in 2017 we celebrated 150 years since The Dominion of Canada, as per the British North America Act of 1867, unified the colonies of Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. The rest of the provinces and territories joined over time. Canada as we know it now — ten provinces and three territories — is not really as old as we think!

Here are some of the best Puns, Jokes and Observations about Canada, and being a Canadian:

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Nothing says Canada like our Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The best place to see them in their Red Serge is at the head of the many parades that take place in small Canadian towns in the summer time!

Jacques Larouche, phoned the RCMP, ‘I’m calling about my neighbour, Étienne. He is hiding marijuana in his firewood.’
The next day the RCMP arrived at Étienne’s house and searched the shed where the firewood is kept. They broke open every piece of firewood, but found no marijuana.
Later, Jacque phoned his friend: ‘Hey Étienne, did the RCMP come to your house?’
‘Yep.’
‘Did they chop all your firewood?’
‘Yep.’
-Author Unknown –

What do you call an RCMP officer when he is standing on the ground?
Royal Canadian Dismounted Police.

We have the mounties, they have the FBI. Can you imagine the FBI doing the Musical Ride?
– Dave Broadfoot, Canadian comedian –

Puns

Author Pierre’s shoulders were slumped; he carried all of Canada’s Berton.

Canada – too cold to leaf.

I don’t mean to sound superficial when I say the Canadian PM has nice hair. Isn’t it Trudeau?

My wife wanted me to take her to visit Northern Canada but I was having Nunavut! (Nunavut is the newest Territory of Canada.)
– Christopher Jobe –

The possible end to NAFTA gives me tariffying nightmares.

There was one absentee PM who may as well have been locked in a plastic bin.
The other MPs would sit around inquiring, “Tupper – where?”

This whole phasing out of pennies is nonsense.

Why don’t Canadian women wear sleeveless dresses?
They aren’t allowed to bare arms.

What did the beaver say to the maple tree?
“It’s been nice gnawing you.”

What do you use to catch an Arctic hare?
A hare net!

What do Arctic hares use to keep their fur lookin’ spiffy?
Hare spray!

What do you call ten Arctic hares hopping backwards through the snow together?
A receding hare line.

What do they decorate cakes with up north? Permafrosting.

What time was it when the monster ate the Canadian prime minister?
Eight P.M.

Which Russian eccentric loved Canadian cuisine?
Raspoutine.

All the rest of the Best Puns Ever are at my other ‘punny’ post – “The Best Puns Ever – Let’s Taco ’bout Them.

Observations

Ah, but don’t get me started on history, because then you shall know the meaning of eternity.
– John Diefenbaker – House of Commons, May 28, 1967 –

All sounds are sharper in winter; the air transmits better. At night I hear more distinctly the steady roar of the North Mountain. In summer it is a sort of complacent purr, as the breezes stroke down its sides; but in winter always the same low, sullen growl.
– John Burroughs, “The Snow-Walkers,” 1866 –

Americans should never underestimate the constant pressure on Canada which the mere presence of the United States has produced. We’re different people from you and we’re different people because of you. Living next to you is in some ways like sleeping with an elephant. No matter how friendly and even-tempered is the beast, if I can call it that, one is effected by every twitch and grunt.
– Pierre Trudeau -Canadian Prime Minister-

By January it had always been winter.
– Annie Proulx, The Shipping News –

Canada has never been a melting-pot; more like a tossed salad.
– Arnold Edinborough –

Canada entered World War I as a colony and came out a nation…
– Bruce Hutchison, Canadian Journalist –

Canada is like your attic, you forget that it’s up there, but when you go, it’s like “Oh man, look at all this great stuff!”
– Author Unknown –

Canada is the most respected country with the richest middle class in the world, but you’re voting for change. Well, aren’t you a special kind of stupid.
– Comment on the election of the Liberal Party in the 2015 Federal Election –

Canada is a country whose main exports are hockey players and cold fronts. Our main imports are baseball players and acid rain.
– Pierre E. Trudeau –

For most Americans, Canada is sort of like a case of latent arthritis. We really don’t think about it, unless it acts up.
– Pat Buchanan –

Canada is the essence of not being. Not English, not American, it is the mathematic of not being. And a subtle flavour – we’re more like celery as a flavour.
― Mike Myers

In any world menu, Canada must be considered the vichyssoise of nations, it’s cold, half-French, and difficult to stir.
– BC newspaper publisher Stuart Keate –

Canadians are fond of a good disaster, especially if it has ice, water, or snow in it. You thought the national flag was about a leaf, didn’t you? Look harder. It’s where someone got axed in the snow.
— Margaret Atwood, in Strange Things: The Malevolent North in Canadian Literature, 1995 –

Canadians often point out that while the American constitution promises “Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,” the constitution of Canada – written in the 1860s in England – sets a more modest goal: “Peace, order, and good government.
– Robert Fulford –

Canadians are an ambivalent lot: One minute they’re peacekeepers, next minute they punch the hell out of each other on the ice rink.
– Ken Wiwa –

English speaking Canadians know the French equivalents of “free”, “prize”, and “no sugar added”, thanks to our extensive education in bilingual cereal packaging.
– Author Unknown –

Every Canadian has a complicated relationship with the United States, whereas Americans think of Canada as the place where the weather comes from.
― Margaret Atwood –

Every country is like a particular type of person. America is like a belligerent, adolescent boy, Canada is like an intelligent, 35 year old woman. Australia is like Jack Nicholson.
– Douglas Adams –

For American Visitors – Canada is like your attic, you forget that it’s up there, but when you go, it’s like “Oh man, look at all this great stuff!”
– Author Unknown –

For some reason a glaze passes over people’s faces when you say “Canada”. Maybe we should invade South Dakota or something.
– Sandra Gotlieb, Wife of Canadian ambassador to U.S. –

In a world darkened by ethnic conflicts that tear nations apart, Canada stands as a model of how people of different cultures can live and work together in peace, prosperity, and mutual respect.
– Bill Clinton –

In the 1970s, CBC Radio‘s This Country in the Morning held a competition whose goal was to compose the conclusion to the phrase: “As Canadian as…” The winning entry read: “… possible, under the circumstances.”
– Author Unknown –

It’s going to be a great country when they finish unpacking it.
– Andrew H. Malcolm –

Not until I came to Canada did I realize that snow was a four-letter word.
— Canadian-Argentine writer Alberto Manguel –

To create a housing shortage in a huge country, heavily wooded, with a small population – ah, that’s the proof of Canadian political genius.
– Author Unknown –

I am told that the Inuit have some sixty words for different kinds of snow. That doesn’t surprise me; they see a lot of it. I live considerably south of the tree line, but even I have seventeen words for snow – none of them usable in public.
– Arthur Black –

I don’t trust any country that looks around a continent and says, ‘Hey, I’ll take the frozen part.’
– Jon Stewart –

If some countries have too much history, we have too much geography.
– W.L. Mackenzie King (1874-1950) Canadian Prime Minister –

In Pierre Elliott Trudeau, Canada has at last produced a political leader worthy of assassination.
– Irving Layton, Canadian poet –

So Americans are once again thinking about trading their baseball gloves for curling brooms. But there’s one problem: Canada has already built Donald Trump’s wall.
– Gersh Kuntzman, New York Daily News -on moving to Canada after the election –

The acquisition of Canada this year, as far as the neighborhood of Quebec, will be a mere matter of marching, and will give us experience for the attack of Halifax the next, and the final expulsion of England from the American continent.
– Thomas Jefferson, statement during an early stage of the War of 1812, in a letter to William Duane (4 August 1812) –

There are few, if any, Canadian men that have never spelled their name in a snow bank.
– Douglas Coupland –

This spring was quite cold in Ottawa, the nation’s capital. The leader of the Conservative Party said that it was so cold that he saw a Liberal with his hands in his own pockets.
– Author Unknown –

Whoever said, “Do the job right the first time and you’ll never have to do it again” never shoveled snow off a Canadian driveway.
– Author Unknown –

We don’t come to Canada for our health. We can think of other ways of enjoying ourselves.
– Prince Philip –

We sing about the North, but live as far south as possible.
– JB McGeachy –

When I was crossing the border into Canada, they asked if I had any firearms with me. I said, ‘Well, what do you need?’
– Steven Wright –

What did the detective in the Arctic say to the suspect?
“Where were you on the night of September to March?”
– Author Unknown –

Jokes

A Canadian is a fellow wearing English tweeds, a Hong Kong shirt and Spanish shoes, who sips Brazilian coffee sweetened with Philippine sugar from a Bavarian cup while nibbling Swiss cheese, sitting at a Danish desk over a Persian rug, after coming home in a German car from an Italian movie… and then writes his Member of Parliament with a Japanese ballpoint pen on French paper, demanding that he do something about foreigners taking away our Canadian jobs.

A Canadian went into a Tom Horton’s and noticed there was a “Roll Up The Rim To Win” Contest. So, he rolled up the rim of his coffee and started yelling, “I’ve won a motor home! I’ve won a motor home!”
The girl at the counter said, “That’s impossible. The biggest prize is a car.”
The person shouted, “No, it’s not a mistake. I’ve won a motor home!” He handed the Cup to the girl who read:
“W I N A B A G E L”

A Canadian was walking down the street with a case of beer under his arm. His friend, Doug, stopped him and asked, “Hey Bob! Whacha get the case of beer for?”
“I got it for my wife, eh.” answered Bob.
“Oh!” exclaimed Doug, “Good trade.”

How many parliamentarians does it take to change a light bulb?
Twelve. Four to form a Parliamentary study committee to decide how to solve the problem; one Francophone to complain that they didn’t translate the solution into French; one Native Canadian to protest that the interests of Native Canadians have been overlooked; one woman from the National Action Committee On the Status Of Women to say that women have been under represented in the process; one to go over the border to the Niagara Falls Factory Outlet Mall and buy a new bulb; one to actually screw it in; one to collect taxes on the whole procedure so the government can afford it; one to buy a case of Molson for everybody to drink; and one to drop the puck.

My Canadian friend came home and found his house on fire; he rushed next door, telephoned the fire department and shouted, ‘Hurry over here… My house is on fire.’
‘OK,’ replied the fireman, ‘how do we get there?’
What? Don’t you still have those big red trucks?’
– Author Unknown –

The Indians on the Aamjiwnaang First Nation reservation in Grand Bend asked their new chief if the coming winter was going to be cold or mild. Since he was a chief in a modern society, he had never been taught the old secrets. When he looked at the sky, he couldn’t tell what the winter was going to be like.
Nevertheless, to be on the safe side, he told his tribe that the winter was indeed going to be cold and that the members of the village should collect firewood to be prepared. But, being a practical leader, after several days, he got an idea. He went to the phone booth, called the Environment Canada Weather Service and asked, ‘Is the coming winter going to be cold?’
‘It looks like this winter is going to be quite cold,’ the meteorologist at the weather service responded.
So the chief went back to his people and told them to collect even more firewood in order to be prepared.
A week later, he called the Environment Canada Weather Service again. ‘Does it still look like it is going to be a very cold winter?’
‘Yes,’ the man at Weather Service again replied, ‘it’s going to be a very cold winter.’
The chief again went back to his people and ordered them to collect every scrap of firewood they could find.
Two weeks later, the chief called the Environment Canada Weather Service again. ‘Are you absolutely sure that the winter is going to be very cold?’
‘Absolutely,’ the man replied. ‘It’s looking more and more like it is going to be one of the coldest winters we’ve ever seen.’
‘How can you be so sure?’ the chief asked.
The weatherman replied, ‘The Indians are collecting a shitload of firewood!’
– Author Unknown –

The New Canadian Tax Form [New Simple Format]
1. How much money did you make? $___,_____._____
2. Send it to us.

Q: What Dr Seuss book do they read every morning in Canada?
A: Tim Hortons Hears a Who.
– Author Unknown –

Only in Canada

… does the local paper cover national and international headlines on 2 pages, but requires 6 pages for hockey… and their municipality buys a Zamboni before a bus.

… are there handicap parking places in front of a skating rink.

… do we leave cars worth thousands of dollars in the driveway and put our useless junk in the garage.

… do we buy hot dogs in packages of twelve and buns in packages of eight.

… do you design your Halloween costume to fit over a snowsuit.

… do the mosquitoes have landing lights.

… do we use the trunk of the car as a deep freeze for part of the year.

… do you perk up when you hear the theme from “Hockey Night in Canada”.

… do you have more ‘Canadian Tire’ money than real money in your wallet.

… do we name our coins a ‘loonie’ and a ‘toonie’.

… do you pay significantly more money for domestic flights than international ones.

What do you think of when you hear the word ‘Canada’!

When the Deer Move Into my Alberta Yard

We spent part of our winter in the sunny south. We returned to our Alberta home yesterday and were met with the carnage that happens when white-tailed deer move into a yard. Alberta

I beg your pardon, But I am eating up your garden.
– The White-tailed Deer –

Trampled flower beds, uprooted bulbs, deer scat

They had eaten all the tulip and grape hyacinth shoots, the top two feet of the raspberry canes, most of a honeysuckle bush and a cedar shrub. There may have been other plants that were up, but they became deer fodder too. The deer dug up and ate many of the bulbs and shortened the willow hedge by a foot or so. Their sharp little hooves chopped, diced and trampled most of the flower beds.

The sole survivors were the Daffodils. This specimen was nibbled on just once, then the deer left it alone. This is the first time in twenty three years that the deer have caused this much damage. Mostly they stay on their side of the fence. Sometimes a few juveniles will enter the yard in the summer and mow down a row of young beans, carrots or lettuce. I then embark on an attitude adjustment program, and they eventually decide that there are friendlier, quieter places to have lunch.

Hard winters, like this one was, caused them to ignore the danger that lurks inside my fence. My absence reinforced the wisdom of their decision. All that will change now. It is spring training time. The deer’s big bambi eyes will soon register looks of surprise, then amusement and finally concern as I assert control over my back yard again. They will have to go back to foraging on the hundreds of acres of woods and farmland on THEIR side of the fence.

It’s one thing if your hobby is to put ships inside a bottle, but a deer in the headlights!… That’s a real talent.
― Josh Stern, And That’s Why I’m Single –

How is your garden doing this spring? What ‘pests’ do you have to contend with?

Beery Best of Canada – Molson Canadian Beer Fridge (Video)

Happy Canada Day to Canadians everywhere!

Savage Chickens beer

The website ‘Beer Canada’ mentions these statistics about beer:

Canada has many competitive advantages in making world class beers: proximity to malt barley, large fresh water supply, educated workforce and more than 10 million local beer drinkers.

 

Per capita consumption of Canadian and imported beer was 63.34 litres per person based on total population. At the provincial level, consumption is highest in Newfoundland at 77.32 litres per person. Beer is Canada’s most popular adult beverage and the Canadian beer industry continues to hold an impressive environmental record. On average 99% of beer bottles were returned in 2015.